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tv   American Morning  CNN  September 21, 2010 6:00am-9:00am EDT

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one more day left of summer. so use it wisely. >> yeah. >> i'm john roberts. >> yeah, more the official start of the fall, although it feels like in much of the country like summer. i'm kiran chetry. we'll have much more on christine o'donnell in a few minutes. nato saying that a chopper went down in southern afghanistan this morning killing nine soldiers. the number of dead in 2010 now to at least 529. the most since the war began nine years ago. the great recession is history. that's the official word from a panel of economists who say it ended more than a year ago. well, you didn't feel it, did you? if it's over, why are so many americans feeling so much pain? we're going to talk with economist jeff saks about that this morning. and the debate continues in the senate on whether to dump the don't ask, don't tell policy. in the meantime, lady gaga is waging her own war against the
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the military policy banning openly gay service members. she brought her star power to a rally in maine urging lawmakers to repeal it. >> what did she say? that freedom is prime rib of america? >> perhaps she said that since she posed in an outfit made up only of prime rib. >> defending everyone's freedom to wear a meat dress should they so choose. and join the live conversation going on right now, go to cnn.com/amfix. well, up first this hour, given the tea party's new superstar a chance to clear the air. >> a lot of questions the way christine o'donnell spent some of her campaign money. a complaint was filed with the federal election commission over a handful of checks that were written in 2009 after her 2008 run for senate was over. christine o'donnell was speaking at a campaign forum in delaware
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last night. and our gary tuchman went to the candidate to give her a chance to respond. take a look. >> we have been ethical. we have not -- i've personally i have not misused the campaign funds. we have our s.e.c. lawyer, a great attorney answering those charges if it ever goes anywhere. >> well, the o'donnell campaign is calling the accusations "frivolous," but there are a lot more records coming out. things that raise all kinds of ethical questions. like a check that o'donnell wrote back in march of 2009 for $750 to a landlord and former boyfriend. gary caught up with the candidate to get a response for that. here's what happened. >> may i ask you the one question you promised to answer. why were you paying rent money with campaign money? >> sorry, not happening. >> that was the one question i had. >> i answered it. >> no, you didn't answer it. >> calling citizens for
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responsibility and ethics in washington did a lot of digging on this story. gone after candidates on both sides of the aisle. they say christine o'donnell is "clearly a criminal and should be prosecuted because of this spending." the executive director explained why last night on ac "360." >> you say in this report that -- that she is a criminal. how can you say that? shouldn't she be innocent until proven guilty? >> well, of course, everyone's innocent until proven guilty, but if you look at the facts in this case. you can look at the campaign finance reports christine o'donnell filed. you can look at what her former campaign sataffers have said, ad two former staffers have both said she basically treated the campaign coffers like her own personal piggy bank and she was spending for her personal lifestyle. this is the stuff that crimes are made of. this is embezzlement. no different than any other employee who steals from their
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job. >> well, we have calls out to christine o'donnell to respond to these questions about her finances. so far, there has been no response. as of right now, o'donnell continues to use campaign cash to pay for her home. but there's a catch to that. it doubles as her election headquarters. brian todd is taking a look inside for us this morning. >> reporter: good morning, john and kiran. this is a campaign struggling to hire staff to ramp up operations at the same time that it's taking on a lot of serious questions about christine o'donnell's past. we've got real insight into how the staff is dealing with all of that. christine o'donnell and her tightly knit staff scrambling to show they're ready for prime time in delaware and beyond. this nondescript townhouse outside wilmington, not the place you'd expect to find a hot campaign that's beaten one political machine and taking on another. inside the o'donnell campaign headquarters right now. it's getting booted up very
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fast. about eight people inside here right now. we're told not only some of them not only work here but live here. five people live in this townhouse, as well. >> reporter: it's here we're looking for answers to questions about her finances and personal past. like this comment in 1999 on bill maher's old show "politically incorrect." >> i dabbled into witchcraft, i hung around people who were doing these things. >> reporter: o'donnell's not here to answer our questions about that. inside this cramped living room, campaign officials say that episode was a moment of soul searching in her youth. the campaign provides us her defense at a public event on sunday. >> i was in high school. how many of you didn't hang out with questionable folks in high school? but no, there's been no witchcraft since. >> reporter: this campaign is scrambling to bring on more staff, including people to handle press questions. matt moran is at first reluctant to go on camera, but then agrees. >> from the broader charges that
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she's misused campaign money, what's your response? >> well, several different quarters would probably qualify as a lot of the establishment. and the supposedly bipartisan organizations that are -- >> you know it never happened -- >> you know, i'm very confident they'll be dismissed as frivolous. and the charges that need to be articulated fully, we have some lawyers looking at that and addressing those concerns. >> matt moran went on to say that o'donnell has been living for a while off her savings. another told me she'd been paying personal expenses with money she's earned doing pr work for a client. john and kiran, back to you. >> brian todd for us this morning. thanks so much. the story we'll be developing all day. for the latest on christine o'donnell, the tea party, or all the political news, go to our website, cnnpolitics.com. pacific gas and electric
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releasing the list of 100 riskiest pipeline segments in its natural gas system after pressure from state regulators. the segment that exploded in san bruno earlier this month killing four people and burning down dozens of homes was not on that list. pg&e president insists that segments on the list do not pose a safety risk. a little confusing as to what the point of the list is. >> and obviously they had some problem there. as witnessed by the video. the man behind a proposed islamic center near ground zero is getting protection from police. that's according to friends who say the imam has been avoiding new york because of security concerns. the new york city police department is not commenting. and a national distracted driver summit gets underway in washington. transportation officials, safety groups, law enforcement all gathering to deal with a deadly problem that only seems to be growing. texting while driving. it's killed over 5,400 last year
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alone in the u.s. officials say that roughly 1 in 6 traffic deaths are now caused by people who do it. the afternoon rush hour in atlanta, a little worse than usual last night after -- yes, that's a small plane that made an emergency landing on i-85. the plane clipped trees on the way down, but was able to miss vehicles and people landing just outside the hov lane. hope there was two people in the aircraft. we don't know why the pilot was forced to come down, but caused quite a scene. >> maybe he was texting while flying. there are strict laws in georgia now, you cannot text while driving. you can -- >> in new york you can't even do that. people, when they ask teens especially or younger drivers under 20, they think it's not as dangerous as drunk driving even though a lot of the stats have shown it is just as dangerous as drunk driving. you don't do it, though. >> ten and two, baby.
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let's talk weather. we've got igor and another storm, as well. but igor did its damage to bermuda yesterday as you know. it is still a hurricane. with winds of 75 miles an hour and approaching newfoundland, the northern part of this storm will get there and maybe scrape it with tropical storm-force winds. but there is still a hurricane watch posted. and look at how it kind of scoots around and actually misses greenland. by then it's not really going to be a hurricane. but nonetheless, very interesting. also interesting, this is tropical storm lisa, newly formed this morning last night as a tropical depression. 40-mile-an-hour winds. it'll be heading off towards the north and west, pretty far away from land at this point. so we're not terribly concerned about lisa. >> we've been pretty fortunate that all the hurricanes are curving around bermuda. bermuda not so lucky. >> the last one kind of went down into mexico. hopefully our luck will continue.
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yesterday we showed you the one piece about the special operations weather team. that's right the special operations weather team. they go in and battle with the alikes of green berets. navy seals, army rangers. believe me, these guys are getting it done. and well, they can't afford to get the forecast wrong. it's an a.m. original. a story you'll only see here on "american morning." >> that's fascinating. >> looking forward to it. >> i want to see if rob will jump out of an aircraft. >> i've done it once before. lady gaga taking the stage for a cause. putting the pressure on republican lawmakers to get rid of the don't ask, don't tell military policy. wait until you hear how she made the argument. i want to give my 5 employees health insurance,
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12 1/2 minutes past the hour. welcome back to the most news in the morning. in just a few hours, the senate is scheduled to vote on whether to go forward with a bill that would authorize the pentagon to allow don't ask, don't tell to be repealed. well, someone who's lending her voice to the cause, lady gaga. she headlined a rally yesterday in portland, maine, in hopes of pressuring the state's two republican senators to help get onboard to get it repealed. >> i'm here because they inspire me. i'm here because i believe in them. i'm here because don't ask, don't tell is wrong. it's unjust. and fundamentally, it is against all we stand for as americans. >> the glasses were a nice touch as she was giving that speech. as we mentioned, don't ask,
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don't tell will be front and center in the senate later today. we'll bring in dana bash live in washington. do you ever think you'd be talking about the repeal of don't ask, don't tell and bringing in lady gaga? >> you can't make this stuff up, that's for sure. what's interesting about this day-to-day, it is going to be dramatic. it is too close to tell right now. nothing in the senate is ever straightforward. what we're talking about here is simply a vote to begin debate on a defense bill that includes the authority you talked about. the authority to repeal don't ask, don't tell after a year-long military review is complete and after military leaders okay it. republicans are trying to block that defense bill from the senate floor. they argue among other things that democrats have set up a process that would make it hard for them to change or amend the bill. so that's why democrats think they are about one or two votes shy of overcoming the gop filibuster. the reason why gay rights
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activists had been targeting susan collins is because she supports repealing don't ask, don't tell, but she released a statement to cnn last night suggesting that the process needs to be changed or she'll vote with her party. i'll read the statement. she said, let me be clear, the don't ask, don't tell law should be changed. she went on to say, it's simply not fair. but she said it is disappointing, however, that instead of allowing a full and open debate on the defense authorization bill the majority leader intends to shut republicans out of the debate, kiran. >> it's yet again as you said not easy. it means to support this, it's tied up with so much other -- >> exactly. >> very, very important and not that controversial issues as it relates to defense spending. so what happens next if this should fail? >> you know, regardless of what happens in congress, the pentagon review, which is ongoing right now is due. the report is due in december the issue, though, is for don't ask, don't tell to be
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overturned, congress does have to act. and despite the fact that the president and military leaders have all said publicly they believe it's time to get rid of the policy. gay rights activists are worried if democrats in november lose control of congress or even have diminished numbers, they say it will be much harder to pass a repeal. that's why they say doing it now is so urgent. and i've got to tell you why there is a lot of frustration in the gay community that the congress and democratic leaders waited so long to pursue this. because it was a campaign promise of the president. >> what about olympia snowe who has been known to vote with democrats. where is she going on this? >> she is pretty much in line with her colleague from maine that she is at this point seems to be sticking with her party and arguing that the process is flawed. she's also somebody who thinks maybe it is best to wait until the pentagon review is done before congress acts. >> dana bash this morning, thanks. >> thank you. coming up now at 17 minutes after the hour. do you hear that sound? it's the sound of the recession ending. 14 months ago.
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the official word is it has been over since june of last year. so why aren't more americans feeling the effects of the recovery? we're going to talk with columbia economist jeff saks after the break. stay with us. imagine if it were this easy to spot the good guys.
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it might not feel like the great recession is over, but according to a group of economists it is. in fact, it ended way back in june of last year. try telling that to millions of americans who are feeling real economic pain. joining us now is jeff saks, director of columbia's earth institute. a special adviser to the united nations. and you've got meetings during the general assembly all this week. you're a busy man this week. >> this is a busy week. 140 world leaders here at the u.n. this week. >> first of all, this headline in the detroit news that i came across really says it all. the registration is over but not the pain. ended 14 months ago, but in many places, jeff, you'd never know it was over. >> the meaning of the recession being over is a technical meaning. it doesn't mean we've come off the bottom or far off the bottom. what this committee does is look at the data month-to-month and ask when did we reach the bottom? and when is there at least some slight recovery starting?
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nobody feels there's much recovery. this is pretty much a dismal situation from the point of view of jobs, from the point of view of household income, and spending. people don't feel that there's a recovery. they may feel that it's not a free fall anymore. >> stimulus was at the highest spending. >> it means that the overall economy began to experience some growth. and actually the growth looked like there was more vigorous recovery building up at the end of last year. but this year, things have slowed down again. and even given the fear there could be a double dip. >> let's talk about that, double-dip recession, some are suggesting we might already be in one. the third quarter of this year may be the third quarter of the recession. what do you think? >> i think it's a weak spell. what's happened is consumers are not spending, they're saving. that's actually for the good.
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because we went through 20 years of overconsumption, spending more than our income. what we really need is for investment to pick up. investment, things like fast rail. but one of the stories in today's "wall street journal" shows that spending on rail has hardly budged because there's still fights about who controls the tracks, the right of way. we're tangled up in knots in a lot of ways. >> one of the big discussions is what to do about the bush tax cuts which are scheduled to expire at the end of this year. president obama says he wants to end the tax cuts on the wealthiest americans, people, households earning more than $250,000. leave them in place for the middle class. republicans are saying, no, leave them in place for everyone because the least thing we can afford to do at this point is to raise taxes. what do you think? >> i don't know what the republicans are thinking. we have a budget hole that's so huge, do they really want to bankrupt the country? and can't the millionaires and the billionaires pay a bit more?
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come on. >> but their point is, if you put more money in the hands of all consumers, you're going to get revenues through increased spending and taxes from spending. >> if you focus only on one thing, you can come to an erroneous conclusion. if you focus on the risks of the budget deficit, you come to another conclusion, which is are we really going to borrow our way back to prosperity by going deeper and deeper into debt with china? >> can you close the revenue gap just on the backs of the wealthiest americans? >> not just. there are going to have to be a lot of things done. we need to cut military spending also because we're spending $100 billion this year in afghanistan. i don't think any american thinks we're getting our money worth on that. there's going to have to be spending cuts. it'd be easy to say, why pay taxes at all? but then we'll go broke on the federal level. >> good luck with your meetings
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at the u.n. this week. >> wonderful, thank you very much. well, weather warriors, a specifically trained air force unit on the ground in afghanistan and iraq. their job is to get the forecast right because getting it wrong could be deadly. rob marciano has an a.m. original next. it's 25 minutes past the hour. they put a white check on the top of every box to let people know that their cereals have healthy whole grain, and they're the right choice... (announcer) general mills makes getting whole grain an easy choice. just look for the white check. hey what's going on? doing the shipping. man, it would be a lot easier if we didn't have to weigh 'em all. if those boxes are under 70 lbs. you don't have to weigh 'em. with these priority mail flat rate boxes from the postal service, if it fits, it ships anywhere in the country for a low flat rate. no weigh? nope. no way. yeah. no weigh? sure. no way! uh-uh. no way. yes way, no weigh. priority mail flat rate box shipping starts at $4.95, only from the postal service.
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25 minutes after the hour. we're back with the most news in the morning. when you picture america's elite special operations forces, you don't really imagine a bunch of meteorologists leaping from the sky to the war zones in iraq and
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afghanistan. >> you don't, but that's exactly what one highly trained group of weather experts is doing. what do they do? they're basically trying to get the forecast right for guys that are in theater? >> right. there's a lot more than what meets the eye, that's for sure. yesterday we introduced you to this elite force. they're called the special operations weather team. they go into battle with the likes of the green berets, army rangers, and believe it or not, i happen to have something in common with these guys, being a meteorologist myself. but that's where our similarities end. >> reporter: they're just like any other soldiers showing off their guns. >> it's what the guys like to use when they're in southern afghanistan where this big wide open space is and they need to reach out and touch somebody. >> what does this have to do with weather? >> you have to be alive to report the weather. >> that's a good point. >> reporter: these guys are special operations weather team
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sowdi. >> the science of what you and i do is pretty much the same. the application is a little different. >> it's environmental recon command style. today is training day. get a fully loaded c-130 on the ground and off loaded quickly. this is the tenth combat weather squadron. dirt bikes, atvs, humvees and sowt personnel. >> these special ops weather guys aren't the weather geeks i went to school with. >> reporter: no, sir, and on the ground is where they go to work. >> the objective is to gather weather information. which means you've got to get out there, get out there quickly and set up whatever equipment you're using to take your data observations. >> temperature, 23. >> temp, 23 celsius.
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>> reporter: sergeant carson has been deployed eight times. >> copy. >> reporter: most have served multiple tours and all of them including sergeant bryce hauser have war stories. >> the ied goes off, and it's my job to let the medivac birds to know what to expect. they were able to get in and get the two wounded guys off the -- off the lz. >> this is an m-4? >> reporter: he commands the sowts and knows how important this is. >> we had guys up in northern iraq taking weather observations and passing them back to 16 aircraft which were about to deliver 1,000 paratroopers. weather cleared up for just a brief period of time, 1,000 guys were able to exit the aircraft and land up in a place and on with the mission they went. >> reporter: so don't refer to
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them as just the weather men. >> to be called just the weather man definitely gets under your skin a little bit. but once you're put in a situation where you have to prove yourself and the weather call is on the line, that's when they realize, hey, this guy isn't just the weather guy. he's a special operations weather man. and he's a soldier. >> there are less than 100 sowts in the air force, and because the unit so small, they have one of the highest deployment rates in the military. they've been doing this since world war ii, and so far, no fatalities. >> sowties? >> right. special operations weather team. >> why are there only 100, though? is it very difficult to be able to do both training wise? >> yes, and they actually have a few job openings if anybody wants to -- >> you look ready. >> i could see you forecasting the weather with an m-4 in one hand and a radio in the other.
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>> if anyone ever accuses me of getting something wrong, i'll cap 'em. >> never call a person with an automatic weapon just a weather man. >> don't that. and it's much more than forecasting. militarily, there's a lot more that has to be considered. you know, can i get across the river? can i get through a mountain pass? and they'll go in and reach out to the locals in afghanistan and iraq and have trained the locals to take weather observations. the more information you have before going into a mission or battle, the better. >> it's true. so they have weather watchers, as well. in iraq and afghanistan. >> exactly. >> thanks, rob. top stories as we cross the half hour. trying to get answers from the tea party candidate for senate in delaware. christine o'donnell's past spending is raising legal and ethical questions. she canceled all appearances on sunday talk shows this weekend but told our gary tuchman last night that her campaigns have been ethical. it is now the deadliest year
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for coalition forces in afghanistan. nato says that a chopper went down in southern afghanistan this morning killing nine u.s. service members and raising the 2010 death toll to at least 529 coalition forces. that's the most since the war began nine years ago. iranian president mahmoud ahmadinejad. protesters filling the streets of new york city. the demonstrators say they won't be silenced like the people who were during a crackdown in iran. let's bring in our jill dougherty. jill, first up, news from afghanistan, chopper crash there. you just returned from afghanistan not too long ago. what do we know about that? >> well, you know, nine people -- i think the most important thing at this point is how did it happen? why did it happen? and what the u.s. is saying is it was not insurgents. and that's important. but they're taking it now nato and the forces are taking it to the taliban in the south. there's a lot of action. and that's where this happened.
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and, you know, i think one of the important things is when this happens, it continues to undermine faith that people have in the united states, europe, and other places in this war. and that's the really dangerous thing. because they need to take it to the taliban, but we just got back from looking at the civilian side of the mission. and that is important too. so they're kind of racing against time. you do as much as you can against the taliban, but you have to convince the afghan people that they want the taliban to be gone, that they don't need the taliban to give them what -- let's say what legal systems and other things that they're not getting from the central government. so that civilian side is hugely important in addition to this fighting. >> the other issue that is most likely to come up is the issue with the hikers still being held. two american hikers are being held and their mothers are saying they're going to be asking to meet with the president of iran ahmadinejad. what is the status of that?
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>> nobody really knows at this point. remember sarah shourd, one of the hikers was released. and interestingly she was released because of the direct intervention of president ahmadinejad. so what does that mean? could he intervene for the other three hikers? will they get out? and it's fascinating to watch ahmadinejad right now. because he really does appear to be hinting that he wants a better relationship with the united states. it seems a little counterintuitive because, you know, we'll have to see what he says when he speaks here. he usually has a lot of pretty strong attacks against the united states. >> for a man who wants a better relationship with the united states, he sure doesn't have the rhetoric to go along with it. >> right. >> one of the things standing in the way of better relations, of course, is iran's nuclear program. what's ahmadinejad saying about that this time around at the u.n. general assembly? >> he always says we have the right to do this because it's peaceful. the united states gets increasingly frustrated with his
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lack of wanting to really come clean on all of the programs. so right now, the strategy is to put as much pressure economically with these very tough sanctions, keep everybody meaning the international community aboard and hope that is going to chip away at the small group of people who are running iran right now. hope that works. >> any times we should watch out for today at the meetings? >> well, today, he's speaking, but the big action will be on thursday when he speaks. and there are a lot of demonstrations. i was at one yesterday. there are going to be two. but there'll be a lot of demonstrations on thursday. >> thanks, jill. >> thanks. also, don't miss larry tonight -- tomorrow night, actually. this is when mahmoud ahmadinejad is going to be on larry's show. he is going to talk about the fate of the americans jailed in iran, also his nuclear ambitions, and much more. it's going to be on "larry king live" tomorrow night 9:00
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eastern. we're going to be right back. it's 36 minutes after the hour.
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39 minutes past the hour. welcome back to the most politics in the morning. president obama getting an earful from voters from a town hall meeting in the nation's capital. the anger and disappointment was being voiced by some of the most ardent supporters. >> quite frankly i'm exhausted. exhausted of defending you, your administration, defending the mantle of change i voted for, and deeply disappointed with where we are right now. >> like a lot of people in my generation, i was really inspired by you and by your campaign and message that you brought. and that inspiration's dying away. it feels like the american dream is not attainable to a lot of us. >> so those were two people that you just heard from. and they join us now from washington. velma hart is the chief financial officer for american veterans, and ted is a law school graduate working as a freelanceresearcher. we wanted to get you both in here because you had powerful
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questions to the president. and you both were such big supporters of the president. velma, when you said you were getting tired of defending the president, it's exhausting. have you lost faith in the president? or do you think it's simply the circumstances we're in that he doesn't necessarily have control of. >> it is absolutely the latter. but i don't know that he doesn't have control of it. i still have great faith in this president. i think that he is an amazing leader. i think he is inspirational. and quite frankly, i thought that my question would set the platform for him -- for a response that would almost be, oh, i don't know whimsical, magical, very powerful on the fact that he does believe that he's made progress. i know he's made progress. the issue for me is that i'm not certain that the progress is felt deeply enough. and that's where i'm looking for the bang for the buck. there's no denying that this president and his administration has made progress in these two years. no denying that at all.
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i just think that for middle class america, we thought we'd reap the benefits for that a lot faster. >> ted, you asked whether or not you thought the american dream was still attainable. why did you choose that question? i know that you had a lot on your mind. you had a lot that you discussed among your friends. why did you ask about the american dream? >> well, it's a real problem that a lot of us who have advanced degrees -- and people who are going to college, maybe they don't know why they went to college. but we are facing massive student loans. the entire generation is just often facing six figures even when you go to public universities. and you have people like me who had good jobs but went back to school. and it's completely -- we are in an untenable situation where the president and teddy kennedy really did a great job fixing
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the student loan situation. but you combine that with a sort of lost contract. there was a civil contract between -- that society had said if you work hard, if you go to school, we will have good jobs for you. and that's why it's -- you're willing to take on a massive amount of debt. and it seems like that's been lost. and it's really hurting a lot of my cohort. >> did you get the answer you were looking for from the president or any more clarity on it? >> i think that unfortunately i felt that the president answered very effectively all of the other questions he was asked by the audience. but like velma, i thought that i had given him a lay-up to say this is why you should still have hope. and he didn't say that. he didn't answer it at all. >> and i'd like to follow up on that, ted, because quite frankly i thought my question about, is
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this new reality would be a perfect platform for him to respond -- that perhaps this isn't the new reality. there may be a new reality. but we're in transition now. and our country is -- is deeply divided. and there are so many competing priorities. i thought his response was going to be a little different on that. but again, i think there is just the reality of where we are. and that makes it very, very challenging for anyone, especially on the fly to answer such difficult questions. and the reality for me is that i knew the question would be difficult. >> well, you said you're exhausted defending him. what do people who have criticisms of the president that talk to you say? what are their biggest beefs? >> that he's all talk and no action, which i absolutely disagree with. i think the health care reform bill is action. i think the student loan
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legislation is action. i think there are -- even, you know, like it or hate it, even the financial reform is action. so i don't get that argument. and i -- and i get pretty passionate about it. i can't tell you i stand on top of tables and, you know, bang my head against the wall, but i believe in him. and i -- you know, there's something about what he communicates that makes me believe that he's got a plan. i just -- i'm tired of having debate -- i think this is a moment of poker or something for me, maybe blackjack or 21. i want to have a card on the table that shuts the discussion and i don't have that yet. >> ted, quickly before you go, as well. what the president said, which i thought was interesting again was he said some of the policies of the past ten years have made it very difficult. do you think he's still blaming the prior administrations for
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the tough economic situation we're in now? >> i think that he's correctly analyzing a situation. it's very complex and very nuanced. and the president actually sat down and explained a lot of the difficult choices that people have to make. and he said that sticking our head -- he implied that sticking our heads in the sand is not going to solve anything. and i think that that's something that people need to understand. that we have -- he has tough actions he needs to take. and we need to -- we need to be willing to make sacrifice. and we need to be willing to take tough actions with him. >> absolutely. and he -- he was quite eloquent on that point yesterday that we are at a time when there are just too many competing priorities and too many things, quite frankly, that are broken. and we are going to have to make some difficult decisions. not just as an administration, not just as legislators, but as
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the american public. we're going to have to make those difficult decisions. and quite frankly, ride through the storm together. and i believe that's true. >> well, you guys are both eloquent in your answers, as well. glad we had a chance to talk to you this morning. good luck to you in the future both of you. >> thank you very much. >> sure. well, the primaries are over, and sarah palin endorsed an awful lot of candidates. how many clinched their nomination? palin's primary score card just ahead. and a stormy start to the day in the midwest. rob's travel forecast after the break.
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welcome back, i'm rob marciano in the cnn severe
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weather center which is where our meteorologists go. this is a look at the daytime highs yesterday. we'll get to that in a second. but let's talk about what's going on with hurricane igor. it's still a hurricane although it's transitioning into a northern atlantic storm. tropical storm warnings are up for parts of newfoundland and this is going to scoot up and get up and scrape greenland a little bit. let's talk about lisa. this was formed earlier this morning, tropical storm-force winds of 40 miles an hour. it's way out there, by africa. and this time of year, we're getting to the time of year where these storms have a hard time getting all the way across the atlantic to the u.s. and hopefully that'll be the case with lisa. back state side, yuma, 106, phoenix, 107, it's been a dreadfully warm summer for some folks and it's continuing. we have the threat for fire across parts of utah and colorado today and a threat for severe across the upper midwest. you're up-to-date weather wise, "american morning" is coming right back. in real life.
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about seven minutes till the top of the hour right now. welcome back to the most politics in the morning.
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sarah palin with a winning seal of approval. >> our senior political editor mark preston live for us in washington. good tuesday morning to you. >> good morning, john. good morning, kiran. politics is very much like sports. you are judged on your wins and losses, and sarah palin was really actively involved in this primary season. so what we did was crunch down the numbers. we looked at them, saw how did she do in this primary? she did okay. of candidates she endorsed in competitive primaries, 18 of them won. she did have 11 losses, however. in baseball, that's be pretty good if you were a starting pitcher. couple of big wins for her was nikki haley. came out of nowhere, beat back some establishment candidates. and some people say sarah palin is the one that really helped her win. she also endorsed christine o'donnell, which everyone's talking about nowadays up in delaware. one of her big losses was karen
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handel down in georgia. go to cnnpolitics.com, you can see the full list. but speaking of christine o'donnell, somebody who came out of nowhere and has really had the bright lights of the media shining in on her, shining in on the small state of delaware. well, she now needs to transition her campaign from this very small scrappy campaign to a full blown general election campaign. in fact, what she wrote on her twitter account late last night. "it's been a wild week since the primary, but our team is staffing up and positioning for a november win." part of that positioning is raising lots of money. she says she has reached her $2 million goal. right now they're working out of a townhouse about ten staffers, expect that to grow in the coming days. let's close out with this very cool picture that was taken just last week. it's a u.s. navy picture sent to cnn. what you see there is sailors serving on the uss ronald
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reagan. and what they're doing is spelling out his initials and the number 100. why they're doing that is because next year, early next year it will be the anniversary of the late president's birthday. and, of course, this is the aircraft carrier named after him. so they're honoring him there. a very cool picture there. you can see that, as well on cnnpolitics.com. >> sailors getting creative today. back on the christine o'donnell news front. this idea that she's using her home as her campaign headquarters, it's been a matter of some controversy in terms of funding. but is it all that unusual? >> you know, it is a little bit unusual. you know, there's been a lot of talk about whether she is misusing her money, whether she's using it for personal expenses. in fact, she told cnn last night that she denied those allegations. we know that there has been an ethics complaint filed by an organization here in washington, d.c. against her. but you know what's real interesting, john, is here in
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washington, d.c., sometimes you have members of congress who don't own houses here in washington, d.c. and in fact, they live in their congressional offices. so it is a little bizarre that she would be living in her campaign headquarters, but remember, she came out of nowhere and she had no money until she won this primary. >> i think we featured jason, he has like a pullout murphy bed and pop tarts in his office and that's where he lives. saves money, he said. more to send back to his family in utah. good to talk to you this morning. >> thanks. we'll check in with mark in the next hour, and for all the political news, head to the web. >> top stories coming your way right after the break. we'll be right back. everything you need to stretch out on long trips. residence inn. ♪
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got it. wow! you win this time good twin! there's no disguising the real deal. good tuesday morning to you. thanks so much for joining us on the most news in the morning.
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it's the 21st of september. typically that's when we made the transition from summer to fall. but you get one more day. one more day today, spend it wisely. >> and enjoy it. in some parts of the country, it feels more like summer than fall. >> enjoy the last day of summer. i'm john roberts, good morning. >> we have a lot to talk about this morning. we're looking for answers from the tea party candidate for senate in delaware. christine o'donnell's past spending raising some legal and ethical questions. we're going to show you what the complaints are about, who's behind them, and how she responded at a delaware campaign forum. he moved millions to tears years ago, now critics say he no longer connects. has president obama lost his touch? ed henry live at the white house where they are trying to find that old magic again. so the experts say the recession is over. in fact, economists say it actually ended a year ago, in june of 2009. it was 18 months long in all. the longest economic downturn since the great depression. but for a lot of americans, it still feels that way, that the recession is not over, in fact.
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so why the struggle for a job and financial stability? up first this hour, giving the tea party's new superstar a chance to clear the air. >> there are questions mounting this morning about the way christine o'donnell spent some of her campaign cash. a complaint was filed with the federal election commission over a handful of checks that were written in 2009 after her 2008 run was over. >> christine o'donnell was speaking at a campaign forum in delaware last night. our gary tuchman went right to the candidate to give her a chance to respond. and he joins us live this morning from delaware. how did it go, gary, when you were asking questions about some of those questionable expenses? >> well, it's unclear at this point. she really hasn't answered the questions just yet. the background is this. the citizens for responsibility and ethics in washington says o'donnell's "clearly a criminal and should be prosecuted" the
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group is claiming she has taken at least $20,000 from campaign money and used it for personal expenditures since 2009. indeed, we now have many of the records and they show o'donnell paid $750 a month for rent for her townhouse in march and april of 2009. back then, she wasn't even a declared candidate for 2010. she was using money from the 2008 campaign. now, we wanted to talk to her about that. so after that candidate forum in middletown, delaware, last night i asked her about the rent payment. she said if i was polite and let her shake voters' hands first, she'll answer my question. but instead, she then gave a general statement. >> we have been ethical. we have not -- i've personally not have misused the campaign funds. and we have our fec lawyer, a great attorney answering those charges if it ever goes anywhere. >> reporter: well, i really wanted to give her a chance to
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answer a specific question about the rent money, so i gave it one more shot. >> reporter: may i ask you the one question you promised you'd answer. >> i did answer it. >> reporter: why were you paying rent with campaign money? >> i already answered it. >> reporter: no, you didn't answer it. >> reporter: i'm not sure if she thought she answered my question or not. we don't know why she used campaign funds to pay rent, buy meals at restaurants, buy gas in her hometown in new jersey, and take trips to texas while she was not an official candidate for anything. she doesn't appear right now ready to discuss specifics. but we'll be happy toy talk to her, kiran, when she's ready. >> and you talked about about the citizens for responsibility and ethics in washington, the so-called watchdog group. nonpartisan, are they nonpartisan, or do they have a bone to pick with her as a tea party candidate in delaware?
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>> well, one of the things she told us why do you take the words of a liberal group? but that group says it is nonpartisan. it says it's just been in the middle of investigating charlie rangel. and that group claims it investigates democrats and republicans thoroughly when they're doing stuff they shouldn't be doing. >> i'm glad you had a chance to catch up with her. gary, thanks for joining us this morning. the o'donnell campaign did say they're confident these accusations will be dismissed as frivolous. and this story will be developing all day. so for more on all of the day's political stories, head to cnnpolitics.com. the senate is set for an important test vote today on efforts to repeal don't ask, don't tell. pop star lady gaga is doing her part. she headed a rally in portland, maine, yesterday to urge the state republicans, both of them republican, to support her repeal and let gays and lesbians
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serve openly in the military. >> i'm here because they inspire me. i'm here because i believe in them. i'm here because don't ask, don't tell is wrong. it's unjust. and fundamentally, it is against all that we stand for as americans. >> so don't ask, don't tell is going to be front and center on capitol hill today. so let's bring in our senior congressional correspondent dana bash. she's live in washington for us. dana, put a pair of glasses on you, and you and lady gaga might not look so different. >> you know what, of all of the outfit she wears, glasses are probably the safest for me, john. >> there you go. >> this vote that lady gaga and other hollywood celebrities and gay rights lobbyists are working so hard on is simply a vote to start a debate.
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republicans are trying to block the bill from coming to the senate floor for several reasons. the one we hear the most is that the senate majority leader harry reid has set up a process that's unfair to gop senators because it limits their ability to offer amendments or change the bill. and that's why maine republican susan collins who supports repealing don't ask, don't tell, suggests she's leaning wards blocking the bill. other republicans, john, they don't believe that congress should be acting at all until the pentagon is finished with its policy review. and that is the reason that means other republican senator olympia snowe, that's why she says she's likely to vote no, as well. i'll read you her statement. she said the question is whether we should be voting on this issue before we have the benefit of comprehensive -- of the comprehensive review that president obama's secretary of defense ordered in march. to secure the input of our men and women in uniform during this time of war as the joint chiefs of staff from all of the services have requested prior to
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any vote. so that is the argument she is making. other people who might tend to support the repeal are making the same argument. that's why going into this vote is too close to call, john. >> republicans are accusing democrats playing politics by holding this so close to the election. do they have a point? >> it was a bit of a surprise when harry reid returned from summer recess and announced they were trying to take up this defense bill. other democratic leaders -- he and others actually argue that the reason why he said that is because it is a must-pass piece of unfinished congressional business. but i've got to tell you, privately, even some democrats will tell you that they realize there are a lot of constituencies who voted for democrats in 2008 who are really frustrated with inaction on their issues. and the gay community is definitely one of them. the president made a campaign promise to repeal don't ask, don't tell back in 2008. so there is an element here of democrats scrambling to prove, hey, at least we're trying. >> dana bash in washington this
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morning, not wearing a prime rib dress. and for that we are thankful. >> any time. >> she's also not wearing a phone as hair. >> how do you wear a phone as hair? >> gaga did it. >> she can pull off anything, can't she? >> she does. let's get a check of this morning's weather headlines. rob marciano's here with us this morning. the northeast is the cool spot in the country, huh? >> yeah, there's some freeze warnings and frost advisories up to the north. change in the air. fall arrives tomorrow, but it's still hurricane season and fall is prime time for that. hurricane igor is now scooting south of newfoundland, canada. still a hurricane, although it's becoming more of a north atlantic storm. out in central atlanta we've got lisa. and there's your forecast for igor, and that's interesting to see. there's lisa, 40-mile-an-hour winds. not too concerned, one, because it's really far away.
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and also the time of year where it's tougher for these storms to make their way across the atlantic. 41 degrees in albany, saranac lake, 31 degrees. yeah, fall arrives tomorrow and starting to feel just like that, a little crisp in the air. >> it's supposed to be 87 in chicago. >> the rest of the country is warming up. we'll talk about that in 30 minutes. >> okay. we'll tell you later. >> top secret information. >> thanks, rob. well, has president obama lost touch? he moved millions to tears just two years ago. now critics say he no longer connects. can he find the magic again? we'll talk about it still ahead. nine minutes past the hour.
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12 minutes now after the hour. they are hearing the criticism loud and clear at the white house. the president is out of touch. he no longer connects. the magic is gone. president obama appearing yesterday at a town hall meeting on cnbc coming face-to-face with one of those critics. a woman who says she's voted for the change that he preached and is still waiting to see it.
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>> i'm exhausted of defending you, defending your administration, defending the mantle of change i voted for. and deeply disappointed with where we are right now. i have been told that i voted for a man who said he was going to change things in a meaningful way for the middle class. i'm one of those people, and i'm waiting, sir. i'm waiting. i don't feel it yet. >> ed henry is live at the white house for us this morning. and ed, is the president failing to connect? is the white house concerned about that? >> well, no doubt they are, john. i spent the last couple of days in sort of southeastern virginia, norfolk virginia beach area on exactly that question. what happened to the obama magic. we picked virginia because he won that state. the first time a democrat did that since 1964. and this particular part of virginia, they elected a freshman democrat. and since that time, he's been running away from the president. a sure sign that the president's
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popularity, some of ththat magi has flipped in places like virginia. the democrat appeared with then candidate obama four times in 2008. now he hasn't appeared with him at all. he voted against health care reform. why? well, we talked to some independent voters in that district who voted for president obama in 2008. and they just say, look, they have no personal against the president. they think he tried to do too much too fast. and number two, they said the economy's so awful right now, people are just in complete panic mode right now and that what they want to do is take it out on their representative. whether it's a democrat, whether it's a republican. and there's going to be a lot of incumbents that go down this fall. >> saying i've got a lot of programs out there, it's going to take time for them to be felt across the country. it doesn't happen overnight. here's how he put it. >> i think the challenge right now is i'm thinking about the next generation and there's a
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lot of folks out there thinking about the next election. >> so -- i mean, it's okay to say that. but people obviously have been waiting a long time for things to get better. the recession officially ended 14 months ago. and a lot of people are still hurting. do they have a great reserve of patience anymore? >> they don't. i spoke to someone who said, look, i voted mccain in 2008, but he had nice things to say about president obama. he thinks the president is trying, but he said, look, i think it's just complete political unrest right now. and basically how he put it was "you better have quick results or you're done." he was talking about the congressional candidate in that race. but he was talking about president obama in 2012, as well. as i noted across the board, there were democrats, republicans, independent voters telling me basically they feel the president tried to do far too much in the first 20 months. inside the white house, they reject that.
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they say they had to do a lot and get it done quickly to prevent the country from going off the cliff. but where they admit some problems is that communication issue that we're hitting on and came out in that cnbc town hall meeting. they acknowledge in the next few years they'll have to do a better job of communicating what the president has gotten done. the american people have not been able to digest that. and that may help them going into 2012, but maybe not so much in 2010 because there's been so much to digest. people who say they want -- they support president obama, they're frustrated right now. and there's a lot of worry in the democratic party they're going to have that taken out on them in november. maybe things will recover in 2012 for the president. >> ed henry for us in the white house this morning, thanks. it may not feel like it to many of you, but the people who study recessions for a living say that this one is over. if it's really over, why do had millions of americans say it feels like we're in recession. why is the unemployment rate so high? where are the jobs? we're going to talk about it
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welcome back to the most news in the morning. coming up on 20 minutes after the hour. time for minding your business. the worst recession since the
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great depression declared history, but that doesn't spell relief necessarily for the millions of americans who are still struggling so hard just to make ends meet. >> what's the disconnect between the technical measures and the reality on the ground? cnnmoney.com's poppy harlow joins us now. you were reporting last week about the new face of poverty. how people are signing up at record numbers for benefits for needing, you know, government assistance. and yet we say the recession's over. >> this is only technical, let me put it that way. the only group of economists in this country that can declare a recession is over have done just that. they said this on monday morning, the national bureau of economic research, it's a nonprofit out since the 20s came out and said, look, we think the recession ended officially all the way back in june 2009. now, you have to think why did it take them more than a year to declare this? well, they look at a lot of things, gdp, how our economy is growing, salaries, inventories, industrial production, and they say it has june 2009 when this
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economy hit rock bottom. since then it has recovered, but they also put a clause in there that's very important. they said they did not conclude that economic conditions since that month have been favorable. so what they're saying, john and kiran, was it was the worst then, but we're not saying that it has improved dramatically since then. that's really critical here. why do you feel like it is still a recession? here's why. i want you to take a look at the unemployment numbers in this country. in june 2009 when the recession apparently ended, our unemployment rate was 9.5%. it went up to above 10% after that, and right now it's at 9.6%. so the unemployment rate in this country is now higher than it was when the recession officially ended. take a listen to the economist. he has a good point as to why you feel like we're still in a recession. take a listen. >> the reason the disconnect, i think, between anyone listening and saying, hey, it doesn't feel like a recovery, what is this guy talking about?
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only 9% of the jobs lost in the private sector have been recovered. and so there's a big disparity where 70% of gdp has recovered, however, only 9% of jobs has recovered. >> only 9% of the jobs have been recovered. take a look at your home prices. this is another reason why you don't feel like the recession is over. 2009 when the recession ended, 172,500, we've only recovered a little bit. the median price now $182,000. see jobs, housing, still pretty abysmal. >> what about the chances of a double-dip recession. the other economist robert shiller thinks the third quarter of this year may be the beginning of a double dip. >> and he's the one in charge of that home price report. exactly. it's interesting. officially double-dip recessions don't necessarily happen. what this group of economists says is that if we see another recession, they will call it a new recession, even if it started six months ago.
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it's not technically a double dip. but we took a survey of 31 economists. and i want to show you what they think. the majority of them think there's only about a 1 in 4 chance of a double-dip recession. that's actually up from 15% who thought that that could happen six months ago. so the increased likelihood is there. that's what the economists we talked to said. but all of them seem to agree high-end employment is here to stay. consumers are concerned about their job, they're unsure about what's going to happen to their tax rate, and they're not sure that the administration has a handle on how to solve the crisis. so that's across the board in agreement among these economists. what's the government doing to prevent a double dip? they're keeping rates incredibly low. the fed has another meeting today, they will stay near zero. they're aiding states, small businesses. but again, the chances, more likely not. but still, people feel like it. and that's the bottom line. >> all right.
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poppy, thanks so much. >> you got it. >> hope for better news ahead. more american parents than ever are pulling their kids out of school to educate them at home. now parents in one american town are taking home schooling to a whole new level. carol costello has an a.m. original coming up. breath of air, then protects it on the long journey to their feeding grounds. one of the most important things you can do is help the next generation. at pacific life, we offer financial solutions to accomplish just that. ask a financial professional about pacific life. the power to help you succeed.
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welcome back to the most news in the morning. 27 minutes past the hour right now. a.m. original, something you'll see only on "american morning." home schooling is apparently hot. the number of american kids
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being taught at home by their parents has nearly doubled. >> many of those families say they have no choice claiming that their other options are either inadequate, unsafe, or both. our carol costello live in washington this morning with a trend that speaks volumes about our schools. you know, i saw the new documentary yesterday coming out very soon. and he paints a bleak picture of the state of our schools and very little choices for parents who want to get their kids a good education. >> and these parents in oklahoma city are taking their kids out of public school and they're teaching them at home. if you want an alternative to sending your kid to a public or private school. what about becoming your child's teacher? as in home schooling. it's not so unusual anymore. in fact, shadow home schools are popping up all over the country. >> isabel, you're next. what color do you need? >> reporter: it's not your normal classroom. and if you ask these parents, that's a good thing. >> when your kids are saying i
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want to do this, and it's some kind of lesson, you smile. because you're like, yes. they like learning. >> reporter: she is homeschooling her kids and they love it. >> do you like being taught by your mom? >> yes! >> why? >> because i get to be with my mommy. >> how does your mom make it fun to learn? >> she does activities. cool activities. >> reporter: and it seems parker's not alone. according to the u.s. department of education, 1.5 million kids are taught by mom and dad. that's up 74% since 1999. >> what do you think the biggest misconception people have of homeschoolers? >> besides being weird and wearing your hair in buns and wearing denim jumpers? we're just like everybody else. it's a decision just like public
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school/private school. >> reporter: a lingering misconception is that the main reason parents decide to home school is for religious reasons. that's not quite true anymore. 36% of parents do homeschool primarily to teach their kids religious and moral values, but 38% homeschool because they don't like the school environment or the way teachers teach. >> you have the flexibility. >> reporter: just ask them, they're home schooling five children. >> just you're taught that you have to go to, you know, a, b, and, c, and if you're not excelling here, you must have something wrong with you. >> what we've learned now is it's unnatural putting 20 children in a room learning on the same schedule, the exact same material in the exact same way is unnatural. >> reporter: what is natural for these parents, homeschooling communities, in effect, shadow schools where they kids can socialize and parents can share learning techniques. >> there's more resources available today.
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you don't have to be a scholar, you know, to teach your children. there's tons o of resources out there to help you. >> reporter: like non-profit groups that provide curriculum, for profit groups that provide weekly lesson plans for groups of parents. still, that doesn't mean it's a cinch. laura brody wrote "love in the time of homeschooling" after homeschooling her daughter for one year. >> we had a very good experience. a lot of successes, but also a lot of fights and power struggles. and i didn't find homeschooling books anywhere that were talking about that. they talked about the advantages of homeschooling, but not so much about the bad days. >> reporter: or the fact homeschooling is a 24/7 job. >> everything is educational and it's 365 days a year. and of course we take breaks, we have fun, we do watch cartoons. we don't just have a time where we turn learning on and learning off. >> do we know where we get volcanic ash? >> reporter: but for a growing number of families, home schooling is the best way to
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raise, as these parents say well-rounded kids who will not become just smart adults, but good people. >> brodie is also concerned that many states don't require parents to have any training. although many who home school wouldn't be happy about the government interfering. still the best homeschoolers realize their limitations. they must bring in trained professionals into their children's lives or form networks with other educators so their kids are getting the education they need to make it into college. john, kiran? >> fascinating. very fascinating and it's doubled in the last decade. amazing. carol, thanks. >> sure. >> and if you'd like to weigh in, it's on our blog cnn.com/amfix. >> meanwhile, 31 minutes past the hour. a chopper goes down in afghanistan. nato says it was a helicopter crash in southern afghanistan this morning that killed nine u.s. service members.
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that makes it the deadliest year for coalition forces in afghanistan. he may be the world's most controversial leader, mahmoud ahmadinejad on deck at the united nations this morning. the mothers of two american hikers still being held captive in iran are hoping they'll have a chance to speak with ahmadinejad this week. and christine o'donnell is denying that she misused money from her last senate run. but she did shy away from specifics when she was asked by our gary tuchman at a campaign forum last night. >> why are you listening to a liberal organization in the first place? they're scared that the person that harry reid called his pet is not going to get the seat. the momentum surrounding this campaign is obvious. that's why they're creating baseless accusations. >> can you talk about -- >> i am confident that we have been ethical. we have not -- i personally have not misused the campaign funds. and we have our lawyer, a great attorney answering those charges
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if it ever goes anywhere. >> a watchdog group has filed a complaint with the federal elections commission over checks o'donnell wrote months after her 2008 campaign ended. the camp has not responded to our calls this morning, but she said very confidently that the accusations will be dismissed as frivolous. time for our political ticker this morning. a senate showdown on don't ask, don't tell. >> today's the day that lawmakers are scheduled to vote on a bill that includes the repeal of the provision. and our senior editor is live in washington. and mark, good morning, a lot of focus on maine this morning as they talk about don't ask, don't tell. >> there sure is, kiran, sure is, john. look, too close to call. that's what our dana bash and ted barrett are reporting this morning. democrats were hoping to try to get maine's two senators to join them to help break a republican filibuster. in fact, lady gaga, the pop star went up to maine yesterday to do a rally to try to put some
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pressure on these two maine senators to join them to break this filibuster on the don't ask, don't tell military policy. however, we're hearing from these maine senators that they will join their republican colleagues because they're upset that democratic leaders are not allowing full debate on the measure. so, again, we'll find out a little bit later today when that vote occurs in the senate. but moving on, talking about defense issues, donald rumsfeld, the former defense secretary is going to come out with a tell-all memoir early next year. it's going to be called "known and unknown." and its publisher -- his publisher is saying it's going to be filled with previously undisclosed details and insights about the bush administration, 9/11, and the wars in afghanistan and iraq. surely going to be a must read at the beginning of the year. and let's close it with this. focus is on alaska. who would've thought we would have been talking about the alaska senate race just six weeks before the midterm elections? but we are. joe miller, the tea party favorite who defeated the
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republican establishment favorite lisa murkowski is calling foul on his fellow republicans saying lisa murkowski broke her word by deciding to run as a write-in candidate. of course, murkowski said a couple days earlier on cnn that there was a smear campaign directed at her. a lot going on in alaska, kiran, john. >> what was that statement about rumsfeld made about knowns, unknowns, unknown knowns we don't know now but we will know at some point but don't know what we know now. >> i think you're confusing me. it's still early in the morning. that has to do with the war and it had to do with what he's using for his book to try to draw us in. but he says he's going to tell us things we didn't know that was previously disclosed. it it'll be interesting to know what his thinking was. >> you're sure you're not talking about known gnomes? >> now you're really confusing
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me at this point. >> all right. thanks so much, mark. we'll check in with you again in the next hour. now for the political latest, head to our web, as well, cnnpolitics.com. sticking with politics, are moderate republicans being forced out of the republican party? what does it mean for the future of the gop? we'll talk with south carolina republican congressman coming up. it's 36 minutes after the hour. l on my refinance loan, or pay me $1,000? that would be nice, not getting swindled. um...where are we? don't just think about it. put lendingtree to the test. get the best deal, or $1,000. new aveeno positively radiant tinted moisturizers, with scientifically proven soy complex and natural minerals give you sheer coverage instantly, then go on, to even skin tone in four weeks. new aveeno tinted moisturizers. then go on, to even skin tone in four weeks. our points from chase sapphire preferred are worth 25% more on travel. we're like forget florida, we're going on a safari. so we're on the serengeti,
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39 minutes after the hour. christine o'donnell's improbable win in delaware is sending shock waves through the republican party. o'donnell is just one of several tea party success stories who gop establishment folks say is threatening the very existence of the moderate republican. our next guest is republican congressman who has been speaking out against the republican party since he lost his june primary to one of their candidates. he joins us live from washington this morning. congressman, great to see you this morning. do you believe that moderates are being forced out of the republican party? >> well, not so much moderates.
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surely maybe they're unwelcome, but also conservatives of the optimistic sort. i think this would be a tough time for ronald reagan and jack kemp. right now unfortunately, conservatism is being presented with a voice of snarling rather than a face of smiling, and it really doesn't fit america, i think, is the challenge. >> you believe there are no optimists in the tea party? >> i think what we've got is a lot of fear, some very fearful people. and some leaders who are scared of the fearful people. and the result is that a great deal of fear is out there rather than leadership that says sure we've got challenges. but we're americans, we're going to get through it. and we've got great days ahead of us. that's the kind of leadership i hope we'll get. >> congressman, a couple of things you say about the tea party. what you call the small government movement in recent days. i want to share with the audience at home.
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you said first of all, the small government movement is elevating "flame throwers" over legislators. they say one outlandish thing after another about the president and that gives license to others to say even worse things. of course, election year rhetoric is always charged. is this really anything different this year? >> well, here's the thing. i don't think we build our party by distraction and we don't serve our country by division. the key here to pull together as americans and to build on truth, especially to build a conservative movement, a credible conservative movement, build it on truth. the truth is that the president is not a muslim. he's -- he was born in america. and he is not a socialist. he is left of center, i'm right of center. and, in fact, he might say very right of center. but that's okay. we can have a debate about real facts. we don't need to going making up things because as time goes on, that gets embarrassing when you're found out to have built
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something on false information and on scapegoats rather than solutions. the customer turns away and says you've got nothing for me because you're not delivering a solution. >> congressman, during your election campaign or the primary campaign, rather, you resisted saying some of the more charged things about the president that your opponent was. do you think that hurt you? >> oh, yeah. people wanted me to say -- calling me a socialist every other day. but the ninth commandment should constrain us. don't bear false witness against your neighbor. that's something that we are socialist conservatives should be evidencing in our campaigns. we don't go around saying those things because it's not true. it's also not true that he's a muslim. it's not true that he wants to take over as a dictator. these things -- we need to get rid of these things so we can build on credible, solid information.
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we do that, we can build a credible, conservative movement in this country that shows that free enterprise and family are the solutions we're looking for. >> congressman, what are your thoughts on christine o'donnell who is a conservative. she's the republican nominee in delaware. some establishment conservatives like karl rove are saying she says a lot of nutty things, she has a checkered past. she's not a candidate that's going to win for us. >> well, i'm concerned because, you know, the things that i read, i don't know her personally. i hope it works out, and that some of these things that are reported don't turn out to be correct. but i think it's, again, very important that we be credible. and have candidates that don don't -- don't run in front of the flame throwers. that's a reference earlier we've got these hot microphones that want to charge up the fearful crowd and have them run toward the cliff. and if we get leaders saying you don't know the half of it -- >> now, candidates like christine o'donnell hold the
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position that the republican party over the last decade has gotten way off track. and they're just trying to put it back on track. >> yeah. well, i think that we surely did get off track in the years that we had the majority. and we didn't balance the budget. that's for sure. that's correct. but here's the thing, there's a structural deficit. it's medicare, medicaid, social security. at 60% of what we spend now rising to 90% in 2050, that's a structural challenge. that's where america needs a solution. we don't need scapegoats, don't need to blame that on the president. it's not his fault. in fact, he's just been president for two years. this thing's been decades in coming. i've got enemies, al qaeda, taliban, they're not the democrats, they're my country men. they're often wrong, but we can have a debate about how to get that done. we happen to believe as conservatives it's free enterprise that's going to fix that and reliance on family.
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>> bob inglis, thanks for joining us. >> good to be here. we're talking about scattered storms that could pop up in the midwest. unseasonably warm temperatures in the south. rob marciano is also busy tracking lisa in the atlantic and a tropical wave in the eastern caribbean. we'll get a check on the weather for when we come back. 45 minutes past the hour. at northern trust, we understand... that while you may come from the same family... you know, son, you should take up something more strenuous. you have different needs and desires. - i'm reading a book. - what's a book? so we tailor plans for individuals, featuring a range of integrated solutions. you at your usual restaurant? son: maybe. see you tomorrow. stairs? elevator. to see how our multi-faceted approach... can benefit your multi-generational wealth,
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pretty morning in houston. beautiful out there. right now it's 74. some showers, a little bit later, though, they're expecting some thunderstorms. looking for a high of 84 degrees today. in houston, texas. >> rob marciano here tracking your travel forecast across the country and some areas of the country hot, some not so much. >> yeah, and the first day of autumn arrives tomorrow. in some cases like here, it's going to feel a lot more like summer. it's still the hurricane season. as a matter of fact, it's the height of it and a couple active storms out there. let's talk about igor first. i so badly want this storm to go away. just for that reason. looks like it's got a hunch back right now with most of the clouds to the north. the actual track of this thing is going to scoot it across, scape newfoundland and curve. we don't see this track too often. it'll just be a northern atlantic storm.
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lisa out there in the atlanta, just a tropical storm. we're getting into the time of year where these storms have a hard time getting across the atlantic. not terribly concerned about this one. there's a tropical wave in the eastern caribbean. i think we'll be talking about that into the next several days into next week. tropical storm watch expired there across parts of wisconsin. this is a potent front as far as the cool air behind it. and it's drawing out warm air ahead of it. we'll see the warmup across the midwest, southeast, and the northeast after the frosty morning today. temperatures are going to rebound tomorrow. dry conditions out west, and winds gusting to 35 miles per hour, low humidity, red flag warnings are up and fire watches up, as well, that fire southwest of salt lake city more under control. as of last check, they had about 25% containment or so there. 108 in yuma, phoenix, 107, and parts of alabama seeing 100 degrees. and out west, 108 in yuma, that's the warmest they've ever been this late in the season.
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if it seems like it's toasty, it is. and for a lot of folks, it was one of the warmest on record. we're happy to see it go away. >> wasn't this one of the warmest years on record? >> at least for land masses. if you incorporate the water in there, as well, it's a little bit different. it's been toasty to see it go away. >> igor. >> retire the game, too. >> igor to lisa. you have other letters in there. >> doesn't seem to be nearly as violent. >> good. >> maybe next year abbie. abbie normal. >> i'll put a request in. >> thanks. >> you are not in charge of the name. thanks, rob. coming up, rob is going without the weather warriors as they're called. elite weather commandos there in tours of duty in iraq and afghanistan and getting a forecast wrong could be deadly. lady gaga taking the stage and a stand saying don't ask, don't tell the wrong. the political act adds the senate decides whether to open debate on the policy. also, is greed still good?
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the former sheriff of wall street is here to talk about it all. eliot spitzer on the new wall street movie and the end of the great recession. even though it doesn't feel like it. those stories and much more at the top of the hour. [ female announcer ] what if your natural beauty could be flawless, too? new aveeno positively radiant tinted moisturizers, with scientifically proven soy complex and natural minerals give you sheer coverage instantly, then go on, to even skin tone in four weeks. new aveeno tinted moisturizers. ♪ we need to finish those projections ♪ ♪ then output the final presentations ♪ ♪ sally, i'm gonna need 40 copies, obviously collated ♪ what's going on? when we're crunched for time, brad combines office celebrations with official business. it's about efficiency. [ courier ] we can help. when you ship with fedex, you can work right up until the last minute. it gives you more time to get stuff done.
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workers who lost their jobs to the spill. i'm iris cross. we'll keep restoring the jobs, tourist beaches, and businesses impacted by the spill. we've paid over $400 million in claims and set up a $20 billion independently-run claims fund. i was born in new orleans. my family still lives here. i'm gonna be here until we make this right. 54 minutes after the hour. time for your a.m. house call. stories about your health. a report out today alls alzheimer's and other forms of dementia an epidemic and the financial burden is nothing short of crushing. worldwide, the costs associated will be over $600 billion this year. that's 1% of the world's gross domestic product and by 2030 those costs are projected to
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encrease by 85%. joining us from washington on what is world alzheimer's day, harry john, president and ceo of the alzheimer's association. thank you so much for joining us. >> thank you. >> you look at the impact of alzheimer's disease, you know, financial and caregivers and i know that you are one yourself, it's already staggering and as the population ages, it is going to be dramatic worse. >> it's only going to increase as the aging of america and worldwide. alzheimer's is not normal aging. as i know you realize, john, but it is the biggest risk factor of alzheimer's and going to drive the numbers substantially. today, in america, we have an estimated 5.3 million people with the disease and that's going to go as high as 16 million by the middle of the century if we can't change the course of the disease. >> we have had some encouraging news later on the diagnostic front, new tests, spinal taps
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and analyses to give an indication earlier than ever as to who may develop alzheimer's disease. but it's been frustratingly slow in terms of developing any kind of -- i don't want to say cure but even treatment for alzheimer's disease. >> it's true, john. we have seen great progress in science. as you indicated, particularly in the diagnostics, recently. working together in a collaborative fashion with the national institutes on aging and the industry. we've made great progress there but we need to see treatments. today we don't have a treatment to stop or slow the progress of the disease and we have treatments improvements for people's functional lives so we have got to invest more in research to make a difference in that. in time, for this baby boomer generation that is going to have at least 10 million people have the disease themselves. >> a group of alzheimer's researchers recently arrived on capitol hill after taking a
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cross country bicycle ride to raise awareness and get people to sign a petition hoping for 50,000 names on the petition. you have 100,000 signatures. what is this project all about? what are you hoping to do? >> the alzheimer's association's breakthrough ride encompasses a number of researchers out there riding their bikes into washington, d.c. this morning to deliver actually as you said 100,000 signatures indicating that the american public believes that alzheimer's should be the kind of national priority that we need to advance the research and get those treatments you discussed. today, research for alzheimer's is terribly underfunded. $6 billion on cancer. $4 billion for heart disease. they've returned positively in lives saved and alzheimer's, $469 million is all it's being
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spent at the federal level and we need to change that as rapidly as possible as this baby boomer generation ages. >> you know, harry, we talk about the toll that this takes on the patient but as well there's a huge toll on the caregiver. my dear sister god bless her, she was the primary caregiver for my mom that passed away earlier this year and i know you are a caregiver, as well. talk briefly if you would of the toll on the person and on the people around them. >> the toll on the human side is immen immense. caregivers themselves wind up terribly stressed. they wind up giving up not only out of pocket costs but their time and all of their heart. in fact, there is at least one study that indicates that for caregivers who are spouses that they can actually predecease the individual they're caring for who has alzheimer's as a result of the stress. >> wow.
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it's tremendous work you're doing there at the alzheimer's association. we wish you luck in the future and good to have you on this morning, too, harry, on the world's alzheimer's day to raise awareness for the cause. really appreciate it. >> thank you, john. >> top stories after the break. stay with us. [ female announcer ] imagine skin so healthy, it never gets dry again. can your moisturizer do that? [ female announcer ] dermatologist recommended aveeno has an oat formula, now proven to build a moisture reserve, so skin can replenish itself. that's healthy skin for life. only from aveeno. ♪ [ upbeat instrumental ] so skin can replenish itself. [ rattling ] [ gasps ] [ rattling ] [ laughing ] [ announcer ] close enough just isn't good enough. - if your car is in an accident, - [ laughing continues ] make sure it's repaired with the right replacement parts.
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good morning on this tuesday, the 21st of september. very last day of summer. thanks so much for joining us on the most news in the morning. i'm john roberts. >> i'm kiran chetry. we start in afghanistan where nato says a helicopter crashed in southern afghanistan this morning killed nine u.s. service members. the deadliest year of coalition forces in afghanistan. perhaps the world's most controversial leader iranian president mahmoud ahmadinejad on deck at the united nations this morning. and two mothers hoping that he'll give them their sons back. how the fate of two american hikers is hanging over his appearance today. and equality is the prime rib of america. those words from a famous pop star, lady gaga, at a rally pushing for the repeal of the
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military's don't ask, don't tell policy to allow gays to serve openly in the military. the debate front and center taking a vote in the capitol. we'll be talking more about that. >> this after she said hangar steak is the new fashion. the am fix blog is up and running. join the live conversation. it is unfortunately a sad day when we have to say the deadliest year of the war in afghanistan. well, that happened because of a chopper crash overnight that left nine more u.s. service members dead. >> let's bring in jill dougerty with us this morning here in new york for the united nations general assembly. we'll talk about iran in a second. first of all, you just recently returned from afghanistan. tell us what we know about this helicopter crash. >> well, the first question you would ask under the circumstances is, why did it happen? were the insurgents the ones that shot down or just happen? because, you know, helicopters are dangerous. it looks so far as if it was an
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accident. they're saying that there was not insurgent activity in the area so that could be a good sign. the insurgents take responsibility as they always do. or actually credit. but it looks as if that's not the case. but again, it's as you mentioned the most deadly period so far. support for the war in the united states, in europe among the allies is getting lower and lower. people wonder why the united states is there. this can only really hurt that. >> you know, we talk about the support waning not only because of the questions, what are we accomplishing but also the economic costs. we heard from jeff sacks in the first hour spending billions each and every year in afghanistan without clear goals. >> absolutely. you know, when we were there a couple of weeks ago, i think the -- you hear over and over again, you can't win this on a battlefield. it's not going to be just a fight.
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you can't blast out the taliban because a lot of people in afghanistan have relative who is are in the taliban. >> sure. >> they're part of afghanistan. so how do you pull people away from the taliban? because the taliban come in and they provide things that the central government in kabul can't do. so you need what we were following which is the civilian side of it and it's slow but it's really, really important because otherwise it goes on and on with no definition and the one thing that president obama doesn't want as we know is to be there forever. >> we mentioned the united nations general assembly taking place this week. iranian president mahmoud ahmadinejad is in town. the mothers of the two remaining hikers still held at evin prison went an audience with him to try to convince them to release them. what do you think will happen? >> they want, of course, they want their sons out now. one american is out. and in fact, president ahmadinejad was one who
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intervened to get her out so it's natural to want to go to him again. what did he say most recently? he said, well, they broke the law. they came over our border. this is illegal. they did it on purpose. and however why don't you give us those eight iranians held in the united states? tit for tat and the u.s. saying it's apples and oranges. >> is he looking for dialogue? >> signals are out there he is. >> it's interesting because he is speaking to larry king tomorrow night about it. thanks so much. a programming night. it is a special larry king, iranian president mahmoud ahmadinejad joining larry to talk about the fate of the hikers and his nation's nuclear program and much more. that is tomorrow night 9:00 eastern on "larry king live." well, the effort to repeal the military's don't ask, don't tell policy on gays faces a crucial test in the senate today. a vote to begin debate on the defense bill with a provision for repeal may happen.
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>> pop star lady gaga did lobbying urging the state's two republican senators to help get rid of don't ask, don't tell and let gays serve openly. >> i am here because they inspire me. i'm here because i believe in them. i'm here because don't ask, don't tell is wrong. it's unjust. and fundamentally it is against all that we stand for as americans. >> well, our senior congressional correspondent data bash is following the debate. she is live in washington. so lady gaga getting a lot of attention and all eyes should be on the capitol because that's where ultimately this will pass or fail. >> reporter: absolutely. and all eyes are on the capitol. on the united states senate. sources are telling us, kiran, it is going or the very, very close. too close to call and nothing
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here in the senate is ever straightforward, we should explain that what we're talking about here is simply a vote on whether or not to start debate on a pretty big defense bill. $725 billion bill to authorize a lot of spending including a pay raise for troops. but it also does include that authorization for the pentagon to repeal the don't ask, don't tell policy. and republicans say that they're trying to block this bill from coming to the floor for several reasons but the most important one they say is because they say that the senate majority leader reid is setting up a process that doesn't allow the ability to change or amend the bill in a proper way once it gets to the floor and, you know, susan collins, one of the republicans who lady gaga trying to pressure with the rally yesterday in her home state of maine. she is the one republican who has voted in committee to repeal. she agrees with the democrats that the policy should be repealed. however, she has suggested that she is going to stick with her
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party on this process and let me read you a statement she released to cnn last night. she said, let me be clear. the don't ask, don't tell law should be changed. it is simply not fair and said it is disappointing however, instead of following a full and open debate the majority leader intends to shut the republicans out of the debate. a lot of people who want this to happen concerned if they don't get someone like susan collins it might die in the critical vote this afternoon. >> dana, if the vote doesn't go ahead today, what then? >> reporter: regardless of what happens here in congress, there is, of course, a pentagon review that's been on disgoing. started in march and supposed to be completed by december. however, you talk to gay rights advocates and they say, look, remember that this is a policy that if it is going to be repealed must be done by congress. and that is why there is such intense pressure both with big rallies like yesterday and a lot of behind the scenes arm
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twisting going on here at the capitol. because they're very concerned, those who support the repeal that with democrats possibly going to lose the majority in congress but more specifically going to lose their big numbers in congress potentially in november that this is the time to strike and that if republicans are in charge of -- if republicans have more numbers it is harder to get this passed down the road and critical to do right now. >> dana bash for us this morning on capitol hill, thanks. >> reporter: thank you. nine minutes past the hour right now. rob marciano following the weather for us day before summer officially ends. right? >> chilly up in the north right now. temperatures close to freezing mark. beautiful start of the day in the northeast. beauty shot. this time of year, the sun pretty much rises right over the right due east and lights up the eastern buildings or the eastern face of the building in new york. getting to the time of day seeing the smog, as well. cool but 91 in st. louis. some of the numbers surge
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eastward and dramatic warm-up for the last day of fall and few thunderstorms along the front passing slowly to the south and east. as far as what's going on tropically, we are looking at igor which the latest advisory coming out for the 8:00 hour showing it's still a hurricane. tracking just south of newfoundland later on today and then scooting up and then interesting track and more of like a northern atlantic storm than a hurricane before too long. this is tropical storm lisa with winds of 40 miles per hour. this time of year also they have a hard time getting across the atlantic so i'm not terribly concerned with lisa. we have a tropical wave in the eastern atlantic or caribbean which i think is going to be more of a concern especially as we get to next week. hey, weather warriors, guys. later in this hour, talking to you about the special operations weather team, they're in dangerous laces along the navy
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s.e.a.l.s and army rangers and they can't afford to get a forecast wrong. it is an am original story you will see only on here on "american morning" and we'll have that in about 20 minutes. >> weatherman with a gun instead of a clicker. >> my favorite kind of guy. >> rode out of a cargo plane on a motorcycle. is that what we just saw? >> we do that. jump out of planes. crazy stuff. it's -- i'm more comfortable here, though. >> exactly. they did let you tag along. we look forward to seeing that. thanks, rob. still ahead, frustrated voters voicing their concerns to president obama himself. it was a town hall event. pretty extraordinary. has the president lost his touch or one of the hardest times to be leader of the free world? we'll be joined by the deputy washington bureau chief of "time" magazine if a moment.
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ask a financial professional about pacific life. the power to help you succeed. 14 minutes after the hour and this just in to cnn. a retha franklin's son is undergoing emergency surgery. officials say he was severely beaten at a gas station in detroit. two men and a woman attacked him on monday night and being investigated by the detroit police. we'll have more on that when we get it for you. kiran? >> john, thanks.
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there's concern at the white house that the president is not connecting with the people that put him in office, even the most supporters are losing enthusiasm. at a town hall meeting last night, the same day that americans told the recession is officially over, it was hard to find a single satisfied voter. >> i'm exhausted. i'm exhausted of defending you and your administration. defending the mantle of change that i voted for and deeply disappointed. >> i was really inspired by you and your campaign and the message you brought and that inspiration's dying away. it feels like the american dream is not attainable to a lot of us. >> so we want to get more on the challenges facing president obama with michael crowley, deputy washington bureau chief for "time" magazine. i'm sorry. we have a candy crowley and beaten into our heads that's how you say it. >> no relation. >> thank you for joining us this
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morning. >> thank you. >> this is interesting. the president hearing not from people that disagreed with him police cli but the ardent supporters and having a hard time convincing those very people that he is doing enough to move the country in the right direction. where does he go from here? >> well, it's really hard. his options are very limited by the -- among other things, the republicans' ability to filibuster his agenda in the congress and the state of the economy. we have a long way to go to dig ourselves out. a lot has to do with businesses and households getting the finances in order but what happened yesterday was not really a revelation. it is more crystallizing a phenomenon we have known about for a while. we have seen in poll numbers and anecdotal which is that supporters are feeling disillusioned and feeling like they expected more out of him. i think really expectations got too high in the campaign and reached a point where some people really began to feel like obama had magical powers and wave a wand and make their lives
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better but the reality is inheriting a financial disaster like he did and having republicans able to filibuster his agenda in the senate just greatly limit his ability to make a big, quick change in the lives of middle class people who are hurting. >> it is interesting, though. asked about the supporters ort movement, he said this is in the dna and protesting the government since the american revolution and didn't make it personal and it was interesting to note that because how angry people are out there. not to say only tea party supporters are who's angry but wanting the status quo to change. unfortunately, does that include the white house? >> well, look. obviously, the white house wants the status quo to change. i think obama's language of the tea parties was smart and may have been borrowing from bill clinton no said similar things days ago and had the experience of ross perot and the deficit concern perot voters in 1992
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saying you might not like everything they stand for and might be extreme and have terrible ideas but one of the core ideas in the tea party movement is that government spending and deficits are out of control and that is a concern that americans almost across the board share. and you have to show respect for it. you can't just dismiss the entire movement and all their issues. but what obama did say was, okay, i share your concern about deficits but have a grown-up conversation of what cuts we are going to make to get the budget balanced and the deficit in order. that is a hard conversation and a lot of candidates skirting the question trying to have it both ways and i thought he handled that very well. maybe better than response to voters and that sort of thing, emotion in the settings is not obama's strongest suit, unfortunately. >> he made a joke about it, too. somebody said i'm a hedge fund manager and he said i think main street feels that way, too. there was a larger, you know, context to that about whether or not the president is
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anti-business. he argued, again, for why he feels that the wealthiest americans that carry the largest part of the tax burden and wants them taxed them more with the bushxpiring. >> i think the president and white house feels that's a winning issue of the few in this campaign to fight republicans on the question of raising taxes, allowing the bush tax cuts to expire for americans making $250,000 or more. obama frames it as borrowing foreign governments to finance the debt so that we can grow the deficit to give them tax cuts we can't afford. but i think that, you know, the anti-business charge i don't know if it washes. he was supportive of big bailouts for the banks and has the stimulus bill was something that the u.s. chamber of commerce and other businesses wanted for money into the economy but he is wearing that label and it was interesting that he didn't use some of that
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rhetoric we have heard before and talking about greed on wall street and corporate america run amock and he is sensitive to the criticism. >> he mentioned the consumer protection agency trying to make sure that predatory lenders don't make things more difficult for people in the middle class and concern about the unemployment rate and you want strong businesses, businesses that hire so this, you know, feeling whether it's right or wrong he may be anti-business or business perhaps are scared by the changes to health care and the tax rate are questions that are going to keep coming up for the administration. >> absolutely. and this is one of the republicans' favorite lines of attack and feel like it's sticking. i think there's a lot of confusion even among economists as to why businesses who are sitting on huge amounts of capital right now that would be terrific for the economy to move it around and spending it and investing it. there's a debate as to why exactly conservatives argued it's due to uncertainty about
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obama's agenda, what the meaning of the health care law and financial regulatory reform bill are going to be for them. democrats say that's not the case. a lot of economists say that's not the case and more complicated than that and republicans having a field day saying that obama allegedly anti-business and the policies thrown the business community into confusion and hesitation and tough fight for the white house right now. >> certainly tough times for the white house and for a lot of people out there. michael crowley, deputy washington bureau chief of "time" magazine. thank you. >> thank you. >> john? wall street movie premiered last night. is greed still good? how much has wall street changed over the years? eliot spitzer coming up to tell us about that. more parents pulling the kids out of school to home school them and not a religious thing. communities are popping up throughout the country. we'll talk to the parents and the kids coming up next. e annour shines in the spotlight.
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♪ welcome back to the most
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news in the morning. time now for an am original. something you will see only on "american morning." home schooling is awfully hot. the number of american children in the last ten years by their parents nearly doubled. >> a lot of families say they had little choice, claiming that the other options inadequate, unsafe or both. carol costello's live in washington this morning with a trend many say speaks volumes about our schools. good morning. >> speaks nothing good, right? want an alternative? how about becoming your child's teacher as in homeschooling? it is not so unusual anymore. shadow schools are popping up all over the country. >> isabel, you're next. what card do you need -- >> reporter: it is not your normal classroom and if you ask these parents that's a good thing. >> when your kids are saying, i want to do this and it's some kind of lesson, you smile because you're like, yes. they like learning.
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>> reporter: she is home schooling her kids and they love it. >> do you like being taught by your mom? >> yes. >> why? >> because i get to be with mommy. >> how does your mom make it fun to learn? >> she does activities, cool activities. >> reporter: it seems parker's not alone. according to the u.s. department of education, 1.5 million kids are taught by mom and dad. that's up 74% since 1999. what do you think the biggest misconception people have of home schoolers? >> besides being weird and wearing our hair in a bun and denim jumpers? we are like everybody else. we are not super moms. it is a decision just like public school, private school. >> what can you tell me about this? >> reporter: lingering misconception is main reason most parents decide to home school is for religious reasons. that's not quite true anymore.
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36% of parents do home school primarily to teach their kids religious and moral values. but 38% home school because they don't like the school environment or the way teachers teach. >> i mean, the flexibility. >> reporter: just ask this family. they're home schooling five children. >> just you're taught that you have to go to, you know, a, b and c and if you're not excelling here, you must have something wrong with you. >> what we have learned is unnatural putting 20 children in a room learning with one teacher on the same schedule. the exact same material and in the same way is actually quite unnatural. >> reporter: what is natural for these parents, home schooling communities in effect shadow schools where their kids socialize and parents can share learning techniques. >> there's more resources available today. you don't have to be a scholar, you know, to teach your children. there's tons of resources throughout to help you. >> reporter: like non-profit groups that provide an overall
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curriculum. for-profit groups with weekly lesson plans for groups of parents. still, that doesn't mean it's a cinch. laurie wrote "love in the time of homeschooling" after homeschooling her daughter for one year. >> we had a very good experience, a lot of successes but also a lot of fights and power struggles and i didn't find homeschooling books anywhere talking about that. they talked about the advantages of homeschooling but not so much about the bad days. >> reporter: or the fact that home degre homeschooling is all the time we we take breaks and watch tv and don't turn learning on and off. >> reporter: but for a growing number of families, home schools is the best way to raise as these parents would say well-rounded kids who will become not just smart adults but good people. and john and kiran, one of the other trends that's going on
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right now in the world of homeschooling is parents pulling the kids out of school for a year. in fact, laurie pulled her kid out of school for fifth grade, focused in on what she wanted to learn about and solve problems she was having at school and put her back into public schools and the daughter is doing quite well. >> so, when it comes to homeschooling, will r there any particular qualifications a person needs? do the parents need to have a background in education? >> generally, no. each state has its own regulations per se. many states don't have any regulations at all. and if you ask parents that homeschool, they don't want to be regulated but get out of control-controlled public schools and teach their children the way they want to and destroy the beauty of homeschoolers think of homeschooling. in fact, we got some comments on our blog. cnn.com/amfix from three parents that homeschool that say thanks for representing us more fairly because, you know, the -- i
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think that what most people think of homeschooling they think of the woman with the hair in the bun and kind of isolating their kids at home and not letting them socialize with other people and homeschooling has changed a lot in the last 20 or 30 years. >> yeah. it has. i saw another one of your blog comments thanking you for the story saying that i homeschooled my children for two or three years and learned more than the prior six. that the resources, unfortunately, in many communities aren't there for public schools anymore. >> that's right. you know, and one more thing for qualified parents teaching their children. it is sort of the same as public schools. better the teacher, the bet your kid learns. the better the parent teaches, the better the kid learns. same thing if homeschooling as it is in the public schools and but the difference is that parents are concentrating on their children, teaching them what they want to learn and they have a lot of help online these
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days and a lot of help from other parents. >> carol, thanks. >> sure. crossing the half hour right now. time for the top stories. a chopper down in afghanistan. nato saying that the helicopter crash in southern afghanistan killed nine u.s. service members and now the deadliest year for coalition forces in afghanistan. what will he say this time? iranian president mahmoud ahmadinejad on deck at the united nations this morning. the mothers of two american hikers still being held captive in iran hoping they'll get a chance to speak with the iranian president this week. delaware gop nominee christine o'donnell denying she used the funds illegally. >> why are you listening to a liberal organization in the first place? they're scared that the person that harry reid called his pet is not going to get the seat. the momentum surrounding the campaign is obvious.
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that's why they're creating baseless accusations. >> can you talk about -- >> stop it. i'm confident that we have been ethical. we have not, i personally have not misused the campaign funds. we have our fec lawyer, a great attorney, answering those charges if it ever goes anywhere. >> a watchdog group filed a complaint over checks that o'donnell wrote after the 2008 campaign ended. the campaign not responded to phone calls this morning and did say in a statement it's very confident that the accusations will be dismissed as frivolous. time now for the latest news from the best political team on television. crossing our political ticker this morning, sarah palin's effort to shape the 2010 primaries ends on a positive note and a winning season. >> yeah. our senior political editor mark preston live in washington with i guess you could call it the scoreboard. hi, mark. >> hey, kiran, john.
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politics is very much like sports. very similar. and you're judged by the wins and losses. how did sarah palin do? she was active in this primary campaign. she didn't do too bad, actually. she had 11 losses. among them a candidate in georgia but one of the big wins is nikki haley in south carolina and of course christine o'donnell. speaking of christine o'donnell, talk about somebody who's been running a gorilla campaign until last week. all of a sudden she is the nominee in delaware meaning the campaign has to transition and in doing so you need to raise money. and the past week alone, she said she raised $2 million and should help build the campaign organization in delaware as she tried to defy the odds and winning joe biden's old senate seat. closing on some bad news right now for democrats, gallup has
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new numbers out in the last 12 hours which shows that the enthusiasm gap between republicans and democrats is rather wide. according to these numbers, 47% of republicans are enthusiastic about voting in november. meanwhile, only 28% of democrats and of the gallup analyst, they say that this will almost certainly mean that republicans will get more votes on election day. so a lot of work for democrats over the next six weeks. should they hope to control the house of representatives and still hold back any wins in the senate. john, kiran? >> 47-28? >> 47-28. we all know it's all about enthusiasm and momentum. right now appears to be on the republican side. >> usually in line with a midterm election or are those numbers different? >> i think they're a little bit different. they're in line in the essential of the party of power loses seats in a midterm election and
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a situation where the economy is doing so poorly, so many people unemployed and democrats having to pay the price. >> mark preston, great to talk to you as always. thanks. >> thanks. get the political news at cnnpolitics.com. the new wall street movie premiered last night and is greed still good? how much has wall street really changed over the years since the original move ji? eliot spitzer joins us next. 35 minutes after the hour. to my. long summer days, and not enough sleep. what i wouldn't do for a do-over. [ female announcer ] neutrogena® clinical skincare, exclusive ion2 complex combined with activating cream helps restore collagen depleted skin. neutrogena clinical skincare is clinically tested to undo the look of a year's worth of skin aging in just 4 weeks. do-overs do exist. [ female announcer ] clinical skincare. neutrogena. #1 dermatologist recommended brand.
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♪ 38 minutes past the hour. welcome back. greed is back, at least, you know, on wall street. empty movies. wall street money never sleeps premiered last night. here's a little clip. >> you like insurance. >> what's not to like? easy selling crack to kids in a school playground. >> credit default swap is good idea. it's the execution that isn't. >> you know what they say. bulls make money. bears make money. the pigs, they get slaughtered. >> well, over the past couple of years, we have seen several real-life gordon geckos, the villains, exposed. >> jonning us is a former sheriff of wall street, host of cnn's new program "parker spitzer." eliot spitzer. great to see you. >> thank you for having me on. >> the news is that the
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recession ended and many people in america could say you could fool me. >> i think nobody believes the recession over. one of the two things people care about, one, jobs. two, median family income. in other words, is the middle class beginning to see its income going up? those two numbers are going the wrong direction. we are still 20 million jobs short whatever the figure they use is really an undercount and middle class is hurting and why the sheer measure of gdp means a new people on wall street to bring it back making a ton of money. everybody else is suffering. >> i want your take on what's going on. we talked to michael crowley with if the time" magazine. he said that businesses are sitting on a lot of capital. they have the means, broadly speaking to hire again. so why isn't -- >> the only words that he used that might disagree with a little bit are a lot.
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it's more than a lot. $1.7 trillion. businesses have been profitable cutting the workforce and making money overseas. they're making overseas, not so much domestically and not spending it and investing it because there's no demand domestic a lly for the goods. there isn't enough purchasing power because the middle class lost so much. the net worth of the average household last year down 2.8%, excuse me, last quarter. you're worth less. if there's no demand for stuff, companies aren't going to buy more equipment to build it and that's why we're in a demand depression or recession and that's the crisis we are facing. >> the question is asked is this administration friendly to business or not. the ceo of intel said the next big thing will not be invented here. jobs will not be created here. suggesting the white house doesn't get it and yesterday a
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former law school buddy of the president's in his hedge fund manager said this about what's going on with business. >> listen. i represent the wall street community. we have felt like a pinata. we certainly feel like we've been whacked with a stick. >> the administration's been whacking him with a stick. what is your take? is this a business-friendly administration? >> sure it is. this is one of the most remarkable miscommunication efforts on the part of the white house. the white house should be saying you created this mess. we're changing the rules to make sure we don't have another crisis. making sure you don't commit fraud, we don't have to spend taxpayer money to bail you out. get back to what you're supposed to be doing which is to invent and create and produce and maybe the ceos don't need to make 500 as much as their workers on
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average and make less and pay people a decent wage. this isn't an anti-business administration. the business leadership, chamber of commerce, the voice of the banks that took us over the cliff. it is shocking to me that the president an enthe white house haven't stood up and said you created in mess. we cleaned it up. you are acting like a petulent kid. >> they're the people hiring. the private industry, sector creates more jobs. >> of course it does. >> what is the solution when you say there's a demand recession and people are -- it's cheaper to make things overseas. people overseas want them. >> that's the larger crisis of globalization to deal with and what the president is trying to deal with. we are living in a global economy where labor in the united states competing with india, china, vietnam. outsourcing. there's a tv show about it. outsourcing is key word in terms of global economics but in terms of hiring, small and
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immediate-sized businesses without the bailouts and the rest, their the ones this hire who played by the rules. znt get federal guarantees. didn't get bailed out and the ones to take care of. not the wall street institutions that gamed the system over and over and over. >> back to where we started with the sequel to "wall street." 25 years later or whatever it is, is greed still good? can fiction live up to the reality? >> fiction is always better than reality although wall street, the reality came close. after a crisis like this, a couple of people, not nearly as many as should, get taken away in handcuffs and sent to jail and like a speeding ticket. when you get a speeding ticket, i won't put you on the spot ask you if you have gotten one, i have, you slow down for 10 or 15 miles and then start putting your foot on the accelerator and this is a cycle. for two or three years, wall street will change the behavior. five years from now, another wave of crisis, fraud, crimes,
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greed to push the limits and outrageo outrageous. >> who ever thought credit default swaps would be -- >> household word. >> unfortunately. but just back to what you're saying. is there a solution in the hands of our leaders for what you're talking ant, this crisis of globalization? >> yes. there is a solution but it's not one that fits into the time frame of the electoral cycle. you can't change an economy in two years. president obama and the smart people around him, i disagree with what they have done in terms of the banks but they understand the problem and trying to change the entire structure of an economy. takes 10, 15 years, not 2. to expect the midterm elections a round of applause and approval misses the point and won't happen that quickly. especially ten years of disaster. >> great to see you this morning. >> thank you. my pleasure. >> good the see you. >> premier of "wall street 2" last night and don't miss the premier of "parker switser" starting monday october 4th 8
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p.m. eastern. all right. meanwhi meanwhile, meet the weather warriors, the weather team of the air force. they go into war zones and literally forecast weather on the spot. they let rob marciano tag along for a training session.
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guarantee me the best deal on my refinance loan, or pay me $1,000? that would be nice, not getting swindled. um...where are we? don't just think about it. put lendingtree to the test. get the best deal, or $1,000. when you picture america's elite special ops forces it is
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hard to imagine meteorologists leaping from the skies into the war zoens of iraq and afghanistan. >> that is what weather experts is doing. our rob marciano here with an am original. they're under more pressure than your average meteorologist. >> what did you mean by that? hard to imagine them doing this sort of thing. >> less than 100 of these guys, right? obviously a rare breed. >> it is tough to get the rambo weather guy combination going. there's a select few of them and we yesterday we introduced you to them. they go with the green berets, army rangers and i happen to have one thing in common with them. i, too, am a weather specialist but that's where our similarities end. >> reporter: they're just like any other soldier showing off their guns. >> it's what the guys like to use in the southern afghanistan where there's big, wide open spaces and need to reach out and touch somebody. >> what does this have to do with weather? >> you have to be alive to be
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able to report the weather. >> good point. >> reporter: they're members of an elite unit. special operations weather team. >> the science of what we do, what you and i do is pretty much the same. the application is a little bit different. >> reporter: yeah. much different. it's environmental recon commando style. today is a training day. get a fully loaded c-130 on the ground and offloaded quickly. this is the 10th combat weather squadron. dirt bikes, humvees and personnel. when they get out into a hostile environment, they do in it a hurry out the back of a plane. these guys aren't the weather geeks i went to school with. no, sir. and on the ground is when they go to work. the main objective is to gather weather information so that means you got to get out there and get out there quickly. and you've got to set up
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whatever equipment you're using to take the data observations. >> temperature 23. >> temp 23 celsius. >> reporter: this sergeant is deployed eight times. >> overcast 180. how copy? >> reporter: most served multiple tours in all of them including this sergeant houser have war stories. >> ied goes off. we have guys hurt on the ground and my job to let the birds know exactly what to expect. i suggested a flight path for them to take through a specific pass at that point. they were able to get in and get the two wounded guys off the lz. >> this is an m-4. >> reporter: lieutenant colonel benson mancommands them. >> early on in the iraq campaign we had guys up in northern iraq taking weather observations and passing them back to 16 aircraft about to deliver 1,000 paratroopers.
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weather cleared up for a brief period of time. 1,000 guys exit the aircraft and land up in a place and on with the mission they went. >> reporter: don't refer to them as just the weather men. >> to be called just a weatherman gets under your skin a little bit and once you're in a situation the prove yourself and the weather call is on the line, that's whenever they realize, hey, this guy isn't just the weather guy. he's a special operations weatherman. >> transfer. >> he's a soldier. >> yeah. being called just a weatherman gets under my skin but i'm not killing people, protecting our country. they have one of the highest deployment rates in the military and they've been doing this since world war ii and throughout the missions and mini tours, a month to three months out with the guys an yet to lose one. that's an amazing figure. >> great track record. do the other branches of the services have similar? >> navy has meteorologists and
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air force has what they do what i do back in an office and none like this. they're trained to be a special ops soldier. they go out with the green berets. one or two with a small unit, six to ten guys and think about them training a tight unit for forever and then one weather guy has in and has to blend in and work as a unit. >> isn't that the way it always is, though? >> always the outsider, yes. >> poor thing. dealing with the most treacherous conditions in afghanistan and sandstorms in iraq. there's a lot going on. >> much more than just weather, too. you have to deal with the terrain. can i cross a river? can i get over a mountain? avalanche danger. environmental recon is what they term it and rambo style i look at it. >> great story. thanks. seven minutes to the top of the hour. we'll be back after a quick break.
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welcome back to the most news in the morning. today is world alzheimer's day and a new report points to the staggering impact of alzheimer's as well as other forms of dementia. >> worldwide, the costs associated with dementia over $600 billion this year. that's 1% of the world's gross domestic product. in fact, taking in a monetary level, it represents the biggest company in the world in terms of revenues. by 2030, the costs projected to increase by 85%. earlier, alzheimer's association president harry john said progress in treating the disease is painfully slow in coming. >> do need to see treatments. today we don't have a treatment to stop or slow the progress of the disease even though we have treatments that are improvements for people's functional lives so we have got to invest more in research to make a difference in that in time for this baby boomer generation that is going
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to have at least 10 million people have the disease themselves. >> right now, more than 5 million people in the united states are afflicted with alzheimer's and that number expected to triple by the middle of the century. >> he talked about the small, relatively speaking, amount of funding goes toward it, as well. >> litdling less than $500 million saying woefully underfunded compared to other diseases. >> it's a shame. we'll take a break. two minutes until the top of the hour. mmmm. you don't love me anymore do you billy? what? i didn't buy this cereal to sweet talk your taste buds it's for my heart health. so i can't have any? if you can deprive me of what can help lower my cholesterol... and live with yourself. right. mmm, i worry about your mother. cry herself to sleep every night over my arteries, but have yourself a bowl. good speech dad. [ whimper ]
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